Prevalence and Incidence

The prevalence figures by the CDC are estimates compiled from their own data systems, outpatient databases (Indian Health Services – HIS), US Renal Data Systems (NIH), US Census Bureau and published studies.4 A question on pre-diabetes was included for the first time in the 2006 National Health Interview Survey given to a representative sample of households; approximately 24,300 adults of the ages 18 and older.24

In 2015, approximately 30.3 million Americans or 9.4% of the population, have diabetes: increased from 5.1% in 1997.4,25,53,55 Of these, 23.1 million people are diagnosed with diabetes and 7.2 million people are undiagnosed.55 Pre-diabetes is becoming more common in the United States: the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates one in three U.S. adults aged 18 years or older, or 84.1 million people, had pre-diabetes in 2015.6,53 In addition, 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 18 years or older in 2015.4,53

Figure 1. American Diabetic Status.
ce331-fig01-diabetic-status

In 2015, approximately 193,000, or 0.24% of all people under 20 years of age have diagnosed diabetes.55 About one in every 400 children and adolescents has diabetes.53

Although type 2 diabetes can occur in youth, the national representative data necessary to monitor diabetes trends in youth by type is not available. Clinically-based reports and regional studies suggest that type 2 diabetes, although still rare, is being diagnosed more frequently in children and adolescents, particularly in American Indians, African Americans, and Hispanic/Latino Americans.4,53

As of 2015, approximately 23.1 million, or 7.2% of all people aged 20 years and older have either diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes, and 11.2 million, or 25.9% of all people 65 years or older have diabetes.4,53,55

As of 2015, approximately 15.3 million, or 12.7% of all men aged 20 years or older have diabetes although nearly one third of them are unaware of their condition.4,53,55

And as of 2015, approximately 14.9 million, or 11.7% of all women aged 20 years or older have diabetes and again nearly one-third are unaware. The prevalence of diabetes is higher among non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, and Asian/Pacific Islander women than among non-Hispanic white women.4,53,55