Laser Biopsy

All dental laser wavelengths are capable of performing precise biopsies.  Smaller lesions can often be removed with a compounded topical anesthetic only.  Sutures are rarely needed due to the excellent hemostasis and minimal trauma observed when lasers are used properly.  Any lesion removed needs to be submitted to an oral pathologist for microscopic diagnosis.  The dentist should also note what type of laser was used as there is often a tissue effect visible along the incision known as a “laser artifact.”  The artifact varies depending on the thermal effects of the particular laser and settings used.

Figure 18. Oral Diagnosis - Fibroma removal.
This image depicts Er:YAG laser excisional biopsy of a fibroma on the buccal mucosa.
Er:YAG laser excisional biopsy of a fibroma on the buccal mucosa. A compounded topical anesthetic was used. No sutures were placed and the patient had a comfortable postoperative course. The picture on the right is at six months follow-up exhibits healing with no scarring.