Lasers in Pediatric Dentistry

Dental lasers offer many advantages when treating children.16 All procedures previously discussed apply to pediatric treatments as well. The ability to provide care with less use of needles and high-speed handpieces makes for a less traumatic experience. Behavioral management improves when these frightening devices are not used. Subsequent treatment appointments are often easier to manage as well when the child has a more positive experience. All previously discussed restorative and surgical procedures can be performed safely on children. Dental lasers can also aid in procedures such as pulpotomies and orthodontic surgical needs.

Figure 38. Restorative.
This image depicts Class II caries in teeth A and B in a 7-year-old male.
Class II caries in teeth A and B in a 7-year-old male.
Figure 39. Restorative.
These two images depict that lesions were prepared with Er:YAG laser without anesthesia and that teeth were restored with Glass Ionomer restoration.
  1. Lesions were prepared with Er:YAG laser without anesthesia. No high speed handpiece was used. Some caries was excavated at 5000 RPM using a ceramic round bur that selectively removes carious dentin only (CeraBur by Komet)
  2. Teeth were restored with Glass Ionomer restoration.
Figure 40. Frenectomy.
This image depicts a four-year-old male with significant ankyloglossia.
Four-year-old male with significant ankyloglossia and having some speech problems.
Figure 41. Frenectomy.
This image depicts the four-year-old male immediate postoperative appearance. Topical anesthesia was used and immediate release of the frenum was achieved.
Immediate postoperative appearance. Topical anesthesia was used and immediate release of the frenum was achieved.
Figure 42. Frenectomy – Six months post-op.
This image depicts the four-year-old male six month follow up and no relapse of the ankyloglossia is present.
Six months follow up and no relapse of the ankyloglossia is present. His speech problem resolved quickly with speech therapy after the surgery.
Video 3.
No narrative to video.
Topical anesthetic is applied and a canine is exposed with a diode laser (1064 nm XLASE).
Procedure done by Dr. Larry Kotlow, video courtesy of Technology4Medicine, LLC.