References

  1. U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 29 CFR Part 1910.1030. Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens; needlesticks and other sharps injuries; final rule. Federal Register 2001;66:5317-5325. As amended from and includes 29 CRF Part 1910.1030. Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens; final rule Federal Register 1991;56:64174-64182. Accessed April 1, 2019.
  2. Kohn WG, Collins AS, Cleveland JL, et al. Guidelines for infection control in dental health-care settings--2003. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2003 Dec 19;52(RR-17):1-61. Accessed April 1, 2019.
  3. Rutala WA, Weber DJ, and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). CDC. Guideline for disinfection and sterilization in Healthcare Facilities, 2008. Accessed April 1, 2019.
  4. Schuster L, Chinn RY; Guidelines for environmental infection control in health-care facilities. Recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). Accessed April 1, 2019.
  5. FDA. Medical Devices. FDA-Cleared Sterilants and High Level Disinfectants with General Claims for Processing Reusable Medical and Dental Devices - March 2015. Accessed April 1, 2019.
  6. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Pesticides: Regulating Pesticides. Selected EPA-registered Disinfectants. October 2014. Accessed April 1, 2019.
  7. US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs. List B: EPA's Registered Tuberculocide Products Effective Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Accessed April 1, 2019.
  8. US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs. List E: EPA's Registered Antimicrobial Products Effective Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Human HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus. Accessed April 1, 2019.
  9. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Agriculture. Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Accessed April 1, 2019.

Additional Resources

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