Spills

There is no evidence that bloodborne pathogens (i.e., HBV, HCV, and HIV) have ever been transmitted from a housekeeping surface (e.g., floors, walls, countertops). Nonetheless, cleaning and disinfection of contaminated housekeeping surfaces must follow sound infection-control practices.10,18 Infectious waste spills must be cleaned up immediately using appropriate PPE such as gloves, coveralls, mask, and goggles. The leaking or broken container must immediately be placed into a secondary leak-proof, properly labeled containers biohazard container.

Small spills are managed by removing visible organic matter with absorbent material (e.g., disposable paper towels discarded into a leak-proof, properly labeled containers biohazard container).10,18 OSHA regulations require the use of an EPA-registered disinfectant from EPA List D (i.e., a hospital disinfectant with an HIV, HBV claim), or List E (i.e., a hospital disinfectant with a tuberculocidal, and an HIV and HBV claim), or List B (i.e., a hospital disinfectant with a tuberculocidal claim) to disinfect housekeeping surfaces.25