Environmental Infection Control

Ensure adequate environmental cleaning and disinfections protocols are consistently accomplished to reduce the risk of patient and office personnel exposure to SARS‑CoV‑2.2

  • OHCP should ensure that environmental cleaning and disinfection procedures are performed in a disciplined and consistent manner after each patient.
    • Clean and disinfect the room and equipment according to the Guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Health-Care Settings – 2003.7
  • Routine cleaning and disinfection procedures (e.g., using cleaners and water to clean surfaces before applying an EPA-registered, hospital-grade disinfectant to frequently touched surfaces or objects for appropriate contact times as indicated on the product’s label) are appropriate for SARS‑CoV‑2 in healthcare settings, including those patient-care areas in which aerosol-generating procedures are performed.
    • Refer to List N on the EPA website for EPA-registered disinfectants that have qualified under EPA’s emerging viral pathogens program for use against SARS‑CoV‑2.27
  • Alternative disinfection methods:
    • The efficacy of alternative disinfection methods, such as ultrasonic waves, high intensity UV radiation, and LED blue light against COVID‑19 virus in the dental setting is unknown. The EPA does not routinely review the safety of such devices and cannot confirm whether, or under what circumstances, such products might be effective against the spread of COVID‑19.
    • CDC does not recommend the use of sanitizing tunnels. There is no evidence regarding efficacy in reducing the spread of COVID‑19 and the agents used in sanitizing tunnels could cause skin, eye, or respiratory irritation or damage.
    • EPA only recommends use of the surface disinfectants identified on List N against SARS‑CoV‑2.27
  • Manage laundry and medical waste in accordance with routine policies and procedures.
    • The ADA recommends laundry should be either provided on-site or contracted.3
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