A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
A String around Your Finger: Do We Really Need to Floss? [Course Number: 550] Maria L. Geisinger, DDS, MS; Gentiane Valiquette, DMD
ce-credits-1
This course will review current literature on the effectiveness of flossing and other interdental cleaning in the age of “Flossgate,” the August 2016 assertion in the Associated Press that there is scanty research supporting flossing as a method to improve oral health outcomes. This course will look at the 2011 Cochrane systematic review upon which the government based its decision to omit the recommendation to floss from the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as well as the broader literature and scientific rationale behind flossing and interdental cleaning. Finally, this course will evaluate the current best evidence for oral hygiene methods to prevent caries and periodontal disease.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Panoramic Radiographs: Technique & Anatomy Review [Course Number: 533] Shelly Withers, RDH, MS; Marilynn Heyde, RDH, MPH
ce-credits-2
The purpose of the course is to provide students and clinicians with a review of panoramic imaging techniques in order to take diagnostic images. The course will review normal and abnormal radiographic anatomy and structures, as well as various technique errors and how to correct them.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
A Humanistic Approach to Team Member Motivation [Course Number: 525] Steven Schwartz, DDS
ce-credits-2
This course explains Maslow’s “hierarchy of needs theory” and how the principles could be applied to the dental practice. By completing this course, learners understand why the entire dental team has a role in providing great customer service to patients.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Intraoral Imaging: Basic Principles, Techniques and Error Correction [Course Number: 559] Gail F. Williamson, RDH, MS
ce-credits-2
Properly prescribed intraoral radiographs are an important component of patient diagnosis and treatment. Radiographs are especially helpful in the diagnosis of dental caries, periodontal bone loss, periapical pathosis, and for other observations that may impact patient treatment. It is of the utmost importance that dental professionals are competent in taking intraoral and extraoral radiographic image to ensure the production of diagnostically acceptable images, while keeping the amount of radiation exposure to patients as low as reasonably achievable. This course will focus on intraoral imaging.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Epinephrine: Friend or Foe? [Course Number: 547] M. Louay Taifour, BDS, DMD; Géza T. Terézhalmy, DDS, MA
ce-credits-3
This course will provide evidence-based information essential for determining the therapeutic dose of epinephrine to minimize toxicity when treating anaphylaxis or when epinephrine is used as a vasoconstrictor in conjunction with local anesthesia.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Digital Imaging in Dentistry: Intraoral, Extraoral, and 3D Technology [Course Number: 512] Connie M. Kracher, PhD, MSD
ce-credits-2
The primary objective of this course is to increase your general knowledge of digital imaging and the latest advances in digital technology.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Powerful Therapeutic Spices in Medicine [Course Number: 549] Diane Vernetti-Callahan, RDH, BS
ce-credits-1
This course will discuss the properties of spices regarding nutrient density, their therapeutic uses in medicine, safety profile, and practical culinary applications. As oral health educators, we have the responsibility to understand the scientific evidence surrounding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and provide safe and accurate information to our patients.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
ce-credits-2
The objectives of the course are to identify therapeutic agents commonly prescribed for the treatment of respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary disorders, present their mechanisms of action, discuss indications for their use, and correlate the information to clinical dentistry.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Practice in Motion: Part II - 6 Components of Posture [Course Number: 554] Jacquelyn M. Dylla, DPT, PT, OCS; Jane L. Forrest, EdD, BSDH
ce-credits-2
The focus of this course is to educate dental professionals about the 6 components of posture and various movement strategies, stretches and exercises that can assist with minimizing strain to pain sensitive tissues. This course builds on Practice in Motion - Part I. In addition, the science behind sitting and elements of a good supportive seat are discussed.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Practice in Motion: Part I [Course Number: 553] Jacquelyn M. Dylla, DPT, PT, OCS; Jane L. Forrest, EdD, BSDH
ce-credits-3
The primary focus of this course is to educate dental professionals about efficient sitting positions and movements that assist with minimizing occupational pain and/or injury. As part of this course, we will examine why many practitioners need to change how they sit, discuss common postures/habits that contribute to lifelong pain and the consequences of not changing.
Introduction
Caries Process and Prevention Strategies: Diagnosis[Course Number : 373]Amid I. Ismail, BDS, MPH, MBA, DrPH
ce-credits-1
This is part 6 of a 10-part series entitled Caries Process and Prevention Strategies.  This course introduces the dental professional to the importance of caries diagnosis in prevention of the disease, as well as the intricate link between caries diagnosis and treatment.  The two main methods of lesion diagnosis used today-the visual-tactile or visual methods and bitewing radiography-are discussed, including recent advancements that improve their sensitivity, as well as their limitations.  Topics also include newer approaches to caries diagnosis and management, a brief discussion of why too-early caries lesion diagnosis can be counterproductive and the benefits of enlisting the help of pediatricians in diagnosing caries in children.
Introduction
Caries Process and Prevention Strategies: Epidemiology[Course Number : 368]Edward Lo, BDS, MDS, PhD, FHKAM
ce-credits-1
This is part 1 of a 10-part series entitled Caries Process and Prevention Strategies.  Oral epidemiology is the area of public health that deals with the distribution and the impact of oral disease on the human population.  In this course, emphasis is placed on the relevance of epidemiology to clinical practice and information about the prevalence, incidence and trends of dental caries in the United States is presented.  The term DMF (decayed, missing, and filled teeth) is introduced, along with variations and limitations of the DMF index, and an explanation of how to calculate DMF scores.
Introduction
Smiles For Tomorrow[Course Number : 4]American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
ce-credits-4
The topics reviewed in this continuing education course include:  normal oral structures; common oral conditions; eruption patterns; dental caries and prevention; and orofacial trauma.  Upon completion of this course the user will better understand appropriate evaluation, treatment, and preventive measures that should be instituted during infancy and continued on a regular basis to maintain optimal health.
Introduction
Burning Mouth Syndrome[Course Number : 434]Nancy W. Burkhart, BSDH, MEd, EdD; Terry Rees, DDS, MSD
ce-credits-2
Three primary causes have been identified as possible contributors of Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS):  (1) neurologic, (2) psychogenic or (3) hormonal.  This course gives the participant a working knowledge of the key factors related to BMS and the psychological components, possible etiologies, pathogenesis, treatment protocol, as well as patient education related to BMS.
Introduction
Caries Process and Prevention Strategies: The Agent[Course Number : 369]Susan Higham, BSc, PhD, CBiol, MRSB
ce-credits-1
This is part 2 of a 10-part series entitled Caries Process and Prevention Strategies. Dental caries is a multifactorial, infectious disease affecting a significant percentage of the population. This course describes the etiology and pathways of progression of dental caries, including an in-depth review of the role of dental plaque and oral bacteria.
Introduction
Caries Process and Prevention Strategies: Demineralization/Remineralization[Course Number : 372]Susan Higham, BSc, PhD, CBiol, MRSB
ce-credits-1
This is part 5 of a 10-part series entitled Caries Process and Prevention Strategies. In this course, the dynamic process of demineralization and remineralization is discussed, paying particular attention to tooth hard tissue structure, the role of acid production by cariogenic bacteria, and the critical pH at which tooth enamel begins to dissolve. The role of acid-reducing bacteria, saliva, and fluoride in tooth hard tissue remineralization will also be explained.
Introduction
Caries Process and Prevention Strategies: The Environment[Course Number : 371]Susan Higham, BSc, PhD, CBiol, MRSB
ce-credits-1
This is part 4 of a 10-part series entitled Caries Process and Prevention Strategies. In this course, the role of fermentable carbohydrates is discussed, paying particular attention to how caries can be influenced by the cariogenic potential of ingested sugars and starches, the physical traits of ingested carbohydrates (such as their adhesiveness), and the frequency of intake and exposure to sugars. The Stephan curve, which illustrates the dental pH changes over time in response to a carbohydrate challenge, is also introduced, with a discussion of how factors such as the type of carbohydrate, the buffering capacity of saliva, and the type and amount of bacteria present in plaque affect dental plaque pH responses.
Introduction
Caries Process and Prevention Strategies: The Host[Course Number : 370]Susan Higham, BSc, PhD, CBiol, MRSB
ce-credits-1
This is part 3 of a 10-part series entitled Caries Process and Prevention Strategies. It has been established that a host must be present for caries to develop. In this course, three host factors – the tooth, saliva, and the oral cavity’s immune response – are introduced, and their roles in the caries process are explained.
Introduction
Caries Process and Prevention Strategies: Erosion[Course Number : 374]Susan Higham, BSC, PhD, CBiol, MSB
ce-credits-1
This is part 7 of a 10-part series entitled Caries Process and Prevention Strategies. This course establishes the concept of dental erosion as a condition that is distinct from caries, and as an emerging public health issue with increasing prevalence in people of all ages. Although often generalized under the heading of "tooth wear," there are actually two distinct tooth surface loss processes that must be taken into account. Tooth surface loss can be the result of physical mechanisms, such as attrition and abrasion, or chemical mechanisms triggered by acid. Both of these mechanisms are discussed, as well as the chemical, biological, and behavioral factors that increase or reduce risk of tooth surface loss. In addition, diagnosis and prevention measures related to dental erosion are introduced.
Introduction
Strategies for Searching the Literature Using PubMed[Course Number : 340]Jane L. Forrest, EdD, BSDH; Syrene A. Miller, BA
ce-credits-3
This continuing education course is a follow up to the course, Evidence-Based Decision Making: Introduction and Formulating Good Clinical Questions. The primary learning objectives for this course are to increase your skills in conducting an efficient computerized search using PubMed to answer a specific clinical question, the second step of the Evidence-based process.
Introduction
A Guide to Clinical Differential Diagnosis of Oral Mucosal Lesions [Course Number: 110] Michael W. Finkelstein, DDS, MS; Emily Lanzel, DDS, MS; John W. Hellstein, DDS, MS
ce-credits-4
The primary goal of this course is to help dental professionals learn the process of clinical differential diagnosis of diseases and lesions of the oral mucosa. This course also includes both an interactive and downloadable decision tree to assist in the diagnosis.
Introduction
Oral Piercings: Implications for Dental Professionals [Course Number: 423] Patricia A. Frese, RDH, MEd
ce-credits-3
The goal of this course is to provide dental team members with the knowledge and skills necessary to appropriately treat the patient with oral piercings.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
A String around Your Finger: Do We Really Need to Floss? [Course Number: 550] Maria L. Geisinger, DDS, MS; Gentiane Valiquette, DMD
ce-credits-1
This course will review current literature on the effectiveness of flossing and other interdental cleaning in the age of “Flossgate,” the August 2016 assertion in the Associated Press that there is scanty research supporting flossing as a method to improve oral health outcomes. This course will look at the 2011 Cochrane systematic review upon which the government based its decision to omit the recommendation to floss from the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as well as the broader literature and scientific rationale behind flossing and interdental cleaning. Finally, this course will evaluate the current best evidence for oral hygiene methods to prevent caries and periodontal disease.
Introduction
ce-credits-3
This course will describe how to develop infection control/exposure control strategies appropriate for the oral healthcare setting.
Introduction
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices [Course Number: 94] James S. Wefel, PhD; Robert V. Faller, BS
ce-credits-2
This course is a review and update of cosmetic and therapeutic dentifrices, their impact on market shares and the development of multi-benefit dentifrice technologies.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Epinephrine: Friend or Foe? [Course Number: 547] M. Louay Taifour, BDS, DMD; Géza T. Terézhalmy, DDS, MA
ce-credits-3
This course will provide evidence-based information essential for determining the therapeutic dose of epinephrine to minimize toxicity when treating anaphylaxis or when epinephrine is used as a vasoconstrictor in conjunction with local anesthesia.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
A Humanistic Approach to Team Member Motivation [Course Number: 525] Steven Schwartz, DDS
ce-credits-2
This course explains Maslow’s “hierarchy of needs theory” and how the principles could be applied to the dental practice. By completing this course, learners understand why the entire dental team has a role in providing great customer service to patients.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Panoramic Radiographs: Technique & Anatomy Review [Course Number: 533] Shelly Withers, RDH, MS; Marilynn Heyde, RDH, MPH
ce-credits-2
The purpose of the course is to provide students and clinicians with a review of panoramic imaging techniques in order to take diagnostic images. The course will review normal and abnormal radiographic anatomy and structures, as well as various technique errors and how to correct them.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
An Introduction to Substance Use Disorders for Dental Professionals [Course Number: 545] Patricia A. Frese, RDH, MEd; Elizabeth McClure, RDH, MEd
ce-credits-3
Drug abuse remains a significant epidemic in present day society. According to the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 9.4% of the United States population use illegal drugs. As contemporary dental professionals, it is important that we are educated on the current effects of commonly used and abused drugs or medications including alcohol and nicotine.
A History and Update of Fluoride Dentifrices
Intraoral Imaging: Basic Principles, Techniques and Error Correction [Course Number: 559] Gail F. Williamson, RDH, MS
ce-credits-2
Properly prescribed intraoral radiographs are an important component of patient diagnosis and treatment. Radiographs are especially helpful in the diagnosis of dental caries, periodontal bone loss, periapical pathosis, and for other observations that may impact patient treatment. It is of the utmost importance that dental professionals are competent in taking intraoral and extraoral radiographic image to ensure the production of diagnostically acceptable images, while keeping the amount of radiation exposure to patients as low as reasonably achievable. This course will focus on intraoral imaging.